HomePublic EducationFire Prevention Week 2020

Fire Prevention Week 2020

This year’s FPW campaign, “Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen!TM” works to educate everyone about the simple but important actions they can take to keep themselves, and those around them, safe in the kitchen.

Did you know?

Cooking is the #1 cause of home fires and home fire injuries. Unattended cooking is the leading cause of fires in the kitchen.

Based on 2013-2017 annual averages:

  • Cooking equipment is the leading cause of home* fires and fire injuries, causing 49% of home fires that resulted in 21% of the home fire deaths and 45% of the injuries.
  • Two-thirds (66%) of home cooking fires start with the ignition of food or other cooking materials.
  • Clothing is the item first ignited in less than 1% of these fires, but clothing ignitions lead to 14% of the home cooking equipment fire deaths.
  • Ranges or cooktops account for almost two-thirds (62%) of home cooking fire incidents.
  • Unattended equipment is a factor in one-third (31%) of reported home cooking fires and half (48%) of the associated deaths.
  • Frying dominates the cooking fire problem.
  • Thanksgiving is the peak day for home cooking fires, followed by Christmas Day and Christmas Eve.

Tips

  • Keep an eye on what you fry. Most cooking fires start when someone is frying food.
  • Watch what you are cooking. Fires start when the heat is too high. If you see any smoke or the grease starts to boil, turn the burner off.
  • Make sure you are awake and alert. Alcohol and some drugs can make you sleepy.
  • Wear short sleeves or roll them up so they don’t catch on fire.
  • Make sure children and pets stay at least 3 feet away from a hot stove.
  • Turn pot handles toward the back of the stove so no one can bump them or pull them over.
  • Move things that can burn away from the stove. This includes dishtowels, bags, boxes, paper and curtains.

Helpful Links

 

NCFD Bitmoji Classroom

Explore the world of fire safety via our Bitmoji Classroom on Google Slides.  Each slide is designed for certain grade levels.

About Fire Prevention Week

Since 1922, the NFPA has sponsored the public observance of Fire Prevention Week. In 1925, President Calvin Coolidge proclaimed Fire Prevention Week a national observance, making it the longest-running public health observance in our country. During Fire Prevention Week, children, adults, and teachers learn how to stay safe in case of a fire. Firefighters provide lifesaving public education in an effort to drastically decrease casualties caused by fires.

Fire Prevention Week is observed each year during the week of October 9th in commemoration of the Great Chicago Fire, which began on October 8, 1871, and caused devastating damage. This horrific conflagration killed more than 250 people, left 100,000 homeless, destroyed more than 17,400 structures, and burned more than 2,000 acres of land.